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Sprouted Whole Grain Pasta

Sprouted Whole Grain Pasta

A wonderfully chewy and tender sprouted spelt pasta, you'll want to make every night pasta night!
1 hour
4 Servings
Best enjoyed by candlelight.

If you’ve never tried making fresh homemade pasta, you’re really missing out! It’s such a fun and rewarding process, and probably a lot simpler to make than you realize. With only a few simple ingredients and about 30 minutes of hands on time, you could be eating fresh pasta tonight. This sprouted spelt pasta has such a wonderful taste and texture, I couldn’t stop eating it plain straight from the pot. But, it’s hearty al dante chew will hold up to any sauce and all your favourite toppings. 

Sprouting improves taste and texture and aids in digestibility and bioavailability. It reduces bitterness (saponin) and converts complex carbs into simpler sugars. This results in a sweeter, nuttier taste with a low glycemic index. Because this is a whole grain pasta we prefer a heartier noodle like the fettucini pictured here. However, the dough is pliable enough to make smaller, thinner pastas as well. 

How to properly measure flour

A kitchen scale is recommended because it is the most accurate way to measure flour. However, if you are using cup measures the best method is to fluff up the flour with a spoon then spoon it into a measuring cup (don’t pack it down) until it’s over filled. Sweep the excess flour off the top with a straight edge. This should get you close to the gram weight, but pay attention to the textures described in the recipe and adjust if necessary.

mixing the dough in a stand mixer or food processor

In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, mix sprouted spelt flour and beaten eggs. Add the water and oil. Once the dough comes together, switch to the dough hook and knead until smooth and pliable. In a food processor, blend all ingredients until the dough comes together and then knead by hand. 

rolling pasta by hand

If you don’t have a pasta machine you can roll the dough with a rolling pin (if you don’t have a rolling pin an empty wine bottle with the label removed works too!). Unless you’re a pro at cutting straight lines (I am not), it will make a more rustic shaped pasta, but it was still wonderful!

  1. On a floured surface, roll the dough into a long rectangle. Fold the rectangle into thirds like you would fold a piece of paper to put in an envelope.
  2. Roll the dough out again and repeat the folding process. 
  3. Roll out to desired thickness. It should be thin enough to see light through it. 
  4. Using a pasta cutter, pizza wheel or sharp knife, cut into desired shapes.

recipe notes

  • Don’t skip the resting step! It’s necessary to let the dough hydrate. 
  • Why both olive oil and water? We tried both all oil and all water pastas and while both were delicious, we preferred the final texture when we included both. 
  • You can swap sprouted wheat flour 1:1 for the spelt, but pay attention to the texture. 

Sprouted Whole Grain Pasta

A wonderfully chewy and tender sprouted spelt pasta.
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 3 minutes
Resting Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4

What You'll Need:

  • 250 g Second Spring Sprouted Spelt Flour (about 2½ cups spooned & leveled, see notes above)
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp water

How To Make It:

  • Add sprouted spelt flour to a large bowl and create a well in the center. Add eggs to the well, beat with a fork then incorporate the flour to make a dry, crumbly dough.
  • Add the olive oil and water and continue to mix with your hands until the dough comes together. If the dough is still too dry to come together after thorough mixing, add extra water a tsp at a time. If the dough is sticky, simply incorporate more flour during the next step.
  • Knead the dough on a floured surface for about 5 minutes, until smooth and pliable (not sticky). Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest for at least 30 minutes at room temperature.
  • Cut the dough into 4 equal sections, working with one at a time and re-wrapping the other sections so they don't dry out. Follow the instructions on your pasta machine or stand mixer pasta attachment, or see notes above for rolling your pasta by hand. Roll and cut to desired thickness and shape, then toss in flour and gather loosely to prevent clumping, or hang to dry.
  • To cook the pasta, bring salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook 1-5 minutes, depending on the thickness. It's best to frequently test the texture by tasting. Drain and rinse, then serve as desired.

Notes

Only cook the pasta when you're ready to eat. If you're making the pasta ahead of time, dry it or store uncooked noodles in an airtight container in the fridge. If stored in the fridge, they are best when used within a day or two.

Have you made this recipe? Tag @secondspringaustralia on Instagram!

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Sprouted Whole Grain Spelt Pie Crust

Sprouted Whole Grain Spelt Pie Crust

Traditional flakey, buttery sprouted goodness.
20 minutes (+ 30 minute rest)
2 pies (or 1 double crusted pie)
Perfect for sharing with those you love

Pie crust is one of those classic baked goods that many people find intimidating, let alone an 100% whole grain version. Well I’m here to tell you that flakey, wholesome, buttery sprouted goodness is not only attainable, it’s actually pretty simple! As I was formulating this recipe in our Second Spring test kitchen, our facility maintenance guy stopped by and said as a child he used to sit and watch his grandmother make pie crust, but he hadn’t seen anybody do it since. The final pie crust definitely met his approval, so I guess you could say this one is just like grandma used to make! 

The key here is to follow the directions closely. You want the butter and water to be COLD and add the water 1 tbsp at a time (or even slower) until the dough just comes together. I often read recipes and think to myself, is that chilling step necessary? Well in this case it’s a resounding “yes”. You’ll want the crust itself to be cold as it goes into the oven so the butter melts at the right rate, giving it all those beautiful flakey layers. Not to worry, the rest time just means you have time to preheat the oven and prepare the filling. 

Speaking of filling…the options are endless! We opted for a traditional pumpkin pie this time, but this crust would work well with fruit pies, quiche, chicken pot pie, you name it. 

Can i substitute shortening or lard?

Yes, you can substitute shortening or lard 1:1 in this recipe. 

  • Why Shortening? It melts at a slower rate and is easier to work with. However, shortening has no flavour. We recommend if you’re using shortening to add some shortening and some butter (equal to 3/4 cup total).
  • Why lard? It’s easy to work with and has a wonderful flavour, but this is not an option for vegetarians.

We chose all butter because of the wonderful flavour it imparts, but feel free to use the fat of your preference.

Can i Make my pie crust ahead of time?

Absolutely! Mix your dough then flatten into a rough disk and wrap in plastic, or roll out the pie crust and put the whole pie tin in the fridge or freezer. The crust can keep in the fridge for a few days. Simply add a tsp of vinegar in with the liquid to prevent the crust from oxidizing. If kept in the freezer, thaw in the fridge the day before you’ll be using it.

can i blind bake this pie crust?

Some pie recipes require you to bake the crust but not the filling, in this case you bake the pie shell empty. We don’t recommend blind baking if you’re using all butter because the crust will shrink. If you need to blind bake, substitute shortening or lard.

how do i decorate my pie crust?

Not sure how to flute the edges? It’s pretty easy, I just used my fingers (YouTube is very helpful). But if you don’t want to spend time learning, indent with a fork or as pictured with the pumpkin pie above, make slits along the edge with a sharp knife. It’s all about your preference, no special skills required. If you’d like tutorial videos for fluting the edges, let me know in the comments below. You can also use this dough for a lattice top or to cut out shapes.

Sprouted Whole Grain Spelt Pie Crust

Traditional flakey, buttery sprouted goodness.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Resting Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 2 pies (or 1 double crusted pie)

What You'll Need:

  • cups Second Spring Sprouted Spelt Flour
  • ¾ cup COLD unsalted butter
  • 5-6 tbsp ice cold water (add several ice cubes and stir or place water in the freezer for at least 20 minutes)
  • 1 tsp salt

How To Make It:

  • Mix the flour and salt together in a large bowl.
  • Using a pastry blender or fork, cut in cold butter until you have pea-sized pieces.
  • Sprinkle ice cold water over the mixture one tbsp at a time and work the dough with your hands. Stop adding water when the dough starts to form large clumps. Continue working with your hands until the flour is just incorporated and the dough comes together. Do not overwork, you should still be able to see specks of butter.
  • Divide the dough in half and transfer one piece to a lightly floured work surface. With a rolling pin, gently roll the dough to about half an inch larger than your pie plate. The dough should be easy to roll. If it's too sticky, sprinkle a bit more flour and if it cracks, wet your fingers and gently press it back together.
  • Transfer the dough to the pie plate, press gently so it forms to the pan and trim any uneven edges. Work the scraps of dough evenly back into the edges for a nice thick crust and flute if desired.
  • Repeat with the second half of the dough. If making a double crusted pie, wrap and refrigerate to roll out once the filling is prepared.
  • Chill the pie crusts for 30 minutes (or longer) while you prepare the filling and preheat the oven. Bake according to the filling recipe.

Have you made this recipe? Tag @secondspringaustralia on Instagram.

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Sprouted Spelt Dinner Rolls

Sprouted Spelt Dinner Rolls

Soft buttery rolls, with all the nutty goodness of sprouted whole grain spelt.
2:10 hours
12 Servings
Goes wonderfully with soups and stews.

These Sprouted Spelt Dinner Rolls would make a wonderful addition to any table. They’re perfect for dunking in soups and stews, or sopping up that last bit of sauce. I’ll be honest though, they didn’t even make it to the table – we ate them warm straight from the pan! They’re soft and squishy, with a nutty, buttery flavour. They could even be made a little larger and used as burger or sandwich buns, or shaped into hot dog buns.

These sprouted spelt rolls really showcase the rich nuttiness of sprouted spelt. Sprouting reduces bitterness (saponin) and converts complex carbs into simpler sugars. This results in a sweeter taste with a low glycemic index. Sprouting also helps create the moist, fluffy texture, and it aids in digestibility. This recipe is a bit more involved, so we recommend reading the instructions and tips thoroughly before you begin. Once you have the method down, they’re simple to make with not a lot of hands on time. Happy rolling!

tips for making sprouted spelt rolls

  • Add ingredients in the order listed in the instructions. This keeps the yeast separate until kneading.
  • Warm the milk and butter slowly, just until the butter melts. It should feel warm to the touch but not hot, as that can kill the yeast. If you accidentally heat too much, allow it to cool before mixing the dough.
  • Resist the urge to add extra flour! Sprouted flours are thirsty and the final texture will benefit from higher hydration. Because of this, your dough will be quite sticky. Don’t add too much flour, instead use a dough scraper or spatula if the dough sticks to your counter. Lightly oiling your hands will also help with stickiness while shaping.
  • Sprouted breads benefit from a warm rise. Use a proofing box if you have one, or a cold oven with just the light on works well too. Just remember to remove the dough before preheating the oven!
  • Rising time can vary depending on the temperature, the yeast you use etc. To tell when your dough is ready, give it a gentle poke. If it springs back quickly, give it a bit more rising time. If it springs back slowly, it’s ready to go.

INGREDIENT SUBSTITUTIONS

  • Sprouted Spelt Flour: can be swapped 1:1 for Sprouted Wheat Flour, though it will change the taste.
  • Whole Milk: we use whole milk in this recipe because the dough requires the extra fat to stay rich and fluffy. You can substitute 2%, but whole is preferred. If using skim or 1% milk, we recommend adding some half-and-half or heavy cream, keeping the total amount of liquid the same. We have not tried this recipe with non-dairy milk, but cashew and soy should be good choices as they have the highest fat content. Note that anything other than whole milk may change the flavour and texture slightly.
  • Instant Yeast: you can substitute active dry yeast, it must be dissolved in the liquid first. The rising time may also need to be increased. 
  • Honey: you can use another liquid or granulated sugar of choice. 
  • Butter: if using salted butter, decrease the amount of salt in the recipe by 1/4 tsp.

How to properly measure flour

A kitchen scale is recommended because it is the most accurate way to measure flour. However, if you are using cup measures the best method is to fluff up the flour with a spoon then spoon it into a measuring cup (don’t pack it down) until it’s over filled. Sweep the excess flour off the top with a straight edge. This should get you close to the gram weight, but pay attention to the textures described in the recipe and adjust if necessary.

Can i make sprouted spelt rolls without a stand mixer?

Definitely, but be prepared for an arm workout! Mix the dough together in a large bowl with a wooden spoon until a sticky dough forms. Allow it to rest for 5 – 10 minutes (to help with stickiness), then knead the dough by hand on a lightly floured counter for about 10-12 minutes. To knead, fold the dough onto itself and use the heels of your hands to press it together. Move the dough a quarter turn and repeat. If the dough sticks to the counter, scrape it off with a bench scraper or spatula and add small amounts of flour as necessary. Try not to add too much as it can make the dough dry. If you’re brand new to kneading, there are lots of great YouTube tutorials. Some electric hand mixers also come with dough hooks, which can be used the same as a stand mixer but it may require more kneading time.

Sprouted Spelt Dinner Rolls

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Rising Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings: 12

What You'll Need:

  • 450g Second Spring Sprouted Spelt Flour (about 3 ¾ cups spooned & leveled, see notes above for properly measuring flour)
  • 1⅓ cups whole milk, warmed
  • ¼ cup butter, melted (reduce salt by ¼ tsp if using salted butter)
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 egg
  • tsp salt
  • tsp instant Yeast (1 packet)

How To Make It:

  • Cube butter and add to a small pot or microwave safe bowl with the milk. Slowly warm just until the butter melts, stirring often (low on stove or in 20-30 second increments in microwave).
  • In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook, add the milk/butter mixture, honey and egg. Stir until combined.
  • Add the sprouted spelt flour, then salt and yeast. Mix on low speed for 1-2 minutes, until combined. Switch to medium speed and knead for 6-7 minutes. The dough should be smooth, elastic and sticky.
  • Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Cover the dough with a clean tea towel and place in a warm area to rise for 60 minutes. See notes above for warm area tips.
  • Lightly grease a 9x13 baking dish (or two smaller dishes). Turn out dough onto a floured counter and knead a few times to deflate. Divide in 12-15 pieces. The dough will still be sticky, try to add as little flour as possible.
  • Lightly coat your hands in oil to help with sticking while shaping. To shape the rolls, pull the edges up into the center. Flip the dough ball over, cup your hand, and roll it between your hand and the counter to make smooth balls.
  • Arrange the rolls in the baking pan (it's okay if they're touching). Cover with a tea towel and allow to rise for another 30 minutes. The rolls should look puffy and spring back slowly when gently poked. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 177°C.
  • Bake for 22-25 minutes, until golden. (Optional) After removing from the oven, brush the tops with melted butter. Allow to cool for a few minutes before serving.

Have you made this recipe? Tag @secondspringfoods on Instagram!

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Sprouted Spelt Zucchini Muffins

Sprouted Spelt Zucchini Muffins

Moist and flavourful zucchini muffins made with 100% sprouted whole grain spelt flour.
40 minutes
12 Muffins
Pairs perfectly with fresh air and sunshine.

Last week we got the opportunity to visit the local farm where we source raw spelt. We were hosted by Gary and Joan, who have been growing spelt on their exclusively organic family farm since 1989. We loved the opportunity to learn and connect more closely with the source of our grains. The spelt in these photos will be harvested next week and once it arrives to us, we will soak, sprout, carefully dry and mill it into flour.

We wanted to make a delicious treat to bring with us on our visit that really highlighted spelt’s rich, nutty flavour. We also happened to have some ripe zucchini from one of our backyard gardens, so we thought we would keep this recipe as local as possible. The result was these Sprouted Spelt Zucchini Muffins, and the recipe was too good not to share! They were moist, fluffy, flavourful and effortless. They’re not too sweet, allowing the spelt flavour and hint of cinnamon to shine through. Enjoy for breakfast, snacks or with an afternoon tea!

Spelt is an ancient grain that hasn’t been hybridized, so many people find it easier to digest than modern wheat and it has its own unique nutty flavour. Sprouting improves taste and texture and aids in digestibility. Our sprouted spelt flour is also 100% whole grain.

recipe notes

  • Use a regular size cheese grater to grate the zucchini, grating it finely will add too much moisture and the zucchini will completely disappear into the batter
  • Gently blot the zucchini, don’t squeeze the moisture out. If your zucchini is particularly dry you can skip this step.
  • You could also make this recipe as a loaf, but you’ll need to add about 20-30 minutes to the baking time. Simply bake until a toothpick comes out clean.
  • Once cool, store the muffins in an airtight container at room temperature. They are best when eaten within a few days, or they also freeze well. 

ingredient tips & substitutions

You can easily substitute the walnuts for another nut of choice (pecans would be delicious), dried fruit or chocolate chips. For a dairy free version, you can substitute the butter for coconut oil, but it will alter the taste and texture (we preferred the batch made with butter). We find that sprouted spelt flour pairs particularly well with the rich molasses flavour of brown sugar, but you can swap for another granulated sugar of choice. 

We hope you love this recipe for Sprouted Spelt Zucchini Muffins! Feel free to leave a comment below or tag us on social media.

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Sprouted Spelt Zucchini Muffins

Moist and flavourful zucchini muffins made with 100% sprouted whole grain spelt flour.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 12

What You'll Need:

  • 2 cups Second Spring Organic Sprouted Spelt Flour
  • 1 cup grated zucchini
  • ¾ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts

How To Make It:

  • Preheat oven to 190°C. Line a muffin tin with baking cups.
  • Grate zucchini and lay out on paper towel. Blot out some of the moisture and set aside.
  • In a large bowl, combine sprouted spelt flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt.
  • In a separate bowl, combine brown sugar and butter until there are no lumps. Add eggs and vanilla and beat until smooth.
  • Add wet ingredients and zucchini to the dry mixture and stir until just combined. Fold in walnuts.
  • Divide batter evenly into 12 muffin cups and bake for 20-25 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean.

Have you made this recipe? Tag @secondspringaustralia on Instagram!

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Strawberry Rhubarb Galette with Sprouted Spelt Crust

Strawberry Rhubarb Galette with Sprouted Spelt Crust

Tangy and filling with a flakey, buttery, sprouted whole grain crust.
1 hour & 35 minutes
2 Galettes (12 Servings)
Pairs perfectly with a warm summer evening.
We’ve made our classic sprouted spelt crust many times in different ways, and we’re still amazed by it’s versatility, wonderful rich flavour, and crisp flakey texture. Sprouted spelt flour has a sweet, nutty flavour that makes the recipe perfect for sweet, tart and savoury fillings alike. The natural sweetness also means that no additional sugar is needed in the crust. “Galette” may seem like a fancy dessert, but the crust is simply made with with sprouted spelt flour, salt, butter and water. We’ll walk you through the steps for a wholesome, impressive dessert that’s perfect for sharing.

For the filling

Strawberries and rhubarb are in season right now in Canada, so we chose the freshest local ingredients for the filling. We picked these ourselves from a local farm, and it’s an incredible process from the plant all the way to the table. We highly recommend changing the filling according to what is fresh and in season in your area. Use treasures from your own garden, visit a local farmers market, farm or greenhouse, or look for a local origin on the labels in your grocery store. You can even try a delicious savoury gallete with fresh vegetables! Besides the incredible flavour, it brought so much joy and meaning to the whole process. 

tips FOR MAKING SPROUTED SPELT CRUST

  • To properly measure flour, fluff and spoon it into a measuring cup (don’t pack it down) until it’s over filled. Sweep the excess off the top with a straight edge.
  • The water must be ice cold, add several ice cubes and stir or put a glass of water in the freezer for at least 20 minutes. 
  • Butter also needs to be directly from the fridge cold. Chopping it into smaller cubes will make it easier to work with.
  • Add only as much water as necessary to bring the dough together. Mixing with your hands makes it easier to tell when the dough is ready.
  • Over mixing will cause more gluten to form, making the crust less flakey. Mix it just until the dough forms a cohesive ball. You should still be able to see pieces of butter (they will work in more as you roll). 
  • Don’t skip the chilling step! Cold dough helps butter melt at a slower rate and forms that wonderful flakey texture.
  • Rolling cold dough takes elbow grease, but don’t wait for it to warm up to make rolling easier. It should still feel cold to the touch after rolling. 
  • Don’t stress about rolling the dough into a perfect circle. An oval, rectangle, or rustic shape will still taste just as delicious! If the dough cracks at the edge when rolling, just pat it back together with your fingers, it’s very forgiving. Rough edges are fine too, you can simply tuck them in at the end of shaping.
  • Make sure to leave at least a 2″ border, you want enough to fold up and hold in all that delicious filling!

recipe notes

  • When you mix the filling there will likely be quite a bit of liquid at the bottom of the bowl. We used a few spoonfuls of the liquid in each galette and had some liquid left over at the end. The more liquid you use (and the juicier the fruit), the more ‘jammy’ the filling will be. However, don’t fill it to more than halfway up your crust. The fruit will release more liquid as it cooks and your filling will bubble over the edges. 
  • We used a 1/4 cup of sugar for both galettes and this resulted in a wonderful tart taste. Feel free to give your fruit a try while chopping and adjust the sweetness as needed and to your preference. Any granulated sugar will work. 

Looking for more recipes with our sprouted spelt crust?

Strawberry Rhubarb Galette with Sprouted Spelt Crust

Tangy filling with a flakey, buttery, sprouted whole grain crust.
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Chilling Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 12 (2 Galettes)

What You'll Need:

Sprouted Spelt Crust

  • 2 ¼ cups Second Spring Sprouted Spelt Flour
  • ¾ cup COLD unsalted butter
  • 1 tsp salt
  • about 5 tbsp ice cold water (see notes above)
  • 1 egg (for brushing)
  • Optional: Coarse sugar for sprinkling

Strawberry Rhubarb Filling

  • 2 cups chopped strawberries
  • 1 cup chopped rhubarb
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 3 tbsp cornstarch

How To Make It:

  • Mix the flour and salt together in a large bowl.
  • Using a pastry blender or fork, cut in cold butter until you have pea-sized pieces.
  • Sprinkle ice cold water over the mixture one tbsp at a time and work the dough with your hands. Stop adding water when the dough starts to form large clumps. Continue working with your hands until the flour is just incorporated and the dough comes together. Do not overwork, you should still be able to see specks of butter.
  • Divide in half, wrap in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.
  • In the meantime, prepare the filling by chopping strawberries and rhubarb. Add to a large bowl with sugar and cornstarch, stir to coat evenly.
  • Preheat oven to 190°C.
  • Place chilled dough on a piece of parchment paper and roll into roughly a 10" circle. Don't worry if the edges are ragged or it's not a perfect circle, but aim for an even thickness.
  • Add approximately half of the strawberry filling to the center of the dough, leaving about 2" all the way around. Fold the border over the filling, overlapping where needed and tucking under any rough edges. Gently use a spatula to help you if the border sticks to the parchment (don't worry about the bottom, it won't stick once it bakes).
  • Brush the edge of the dough with a beaten egg. Optional: sprinkle with coarse sugar for some extra sparkle and a little crunch.
  • Transfer the parchment paper to a baking tray and bake 30-40 minutes, until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbling.
  • Repeat steps 7-10 with remaining dough and filling. Serve warm or cold. Delicious on its own or topped with ice cream or fresh whipped cream.

Have you made this recipe? Tag @secondspringaustralia on Instagram!

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Sprouted Spelt Mini Quiche

A person holding a sprouted spelt mini quiche

Sprouted Spelt Mini Quiche

Simple, traditional quiche with sprouted spelt crust, now in bite size!
55 minutes
18 Servings
Enjoy warm on a sunny morning.
A person holding a sprouted spelt mini quiche

The same flakey, buttery, sprouted whole grain goodness as our classic pie crust, this time as mini quiche. This recipe is perfect for brunching with a crowd, or meal prep these for weekday breakfasts (reheating in an oven/toaster oven is preferable). Sprouted spelt has a wonderful rich, nutty flavour that works so well in this all butter crust. Don’t worry if you’ve never made homemade pie crust, it’s much simpler than it seems, and we’re here for any questions you may have!

The crust is made with only sprouted spelt flour, salt, butter and water, the same base recipe as our sprouted whole grain spelt pie crust. Once the dough is made and chilled, simply roll it out, cut in circles and arrange in a muffin tin. Making the flower-like shape is so much easier than it looks, just gently fold and ruffle as you go so that the crust sits tightly to the pan. Don’t worry if the ruffles are uneven, imperfect is beautiful!

Sprouted Spelt mini quiche in a muffin tin before baking
A tray of sprouted spelt mini quiche

For the filling, we went for simple, crowd pleasing broccoli and cheddar, but the possibilities are endless. Mushrooms, spinach, bell pepper, bacon, sausage etc. would all be super delicious. You could also use this recipe to make any kind of sweet pie or tart. We have not yet tried making this all butter crust with vegan butter, so if you try a vegan version, make sure to let us know how it goes! 

Sprouted Spelt Mini Quiche

Simple, traditional quiche, now in bite size!
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 18 Servings

What You'll Need:

Crust

  • cups Second Spring Sprouted Spelt Flour
  • ¾ cup COLD butter
  • 5-6 tbsp ice cold water (add several ice cubes and stir or place water in the freezer for at least 20 minutes)
  • 1 tsp salt

Filling

  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 3 cups broccoli, chopped in bite sized pieces
  • ¼ cup chopped green onion
  • 5 eggs
  • 1 cup milk (2% or whole)
  • 1 cup grated cheddar cheese

How To Make It:

  • Prepare the crust by mixing flour and salt together in a large bowl. Using a pastry blender or fork, cut in cold butter until you have pea-sized pieces. Sprinkle water over the mixture one tbsp at a time and work the dough with your hands. Stop adding water when the dough starts to form large clumps. Continue mixing until the dough just comes together. Do not overwork, you should still be able to see specks of butter. Divide the dough in half, then wrap in plastic and chill for at least 30 minutes.
  • Chop broccoli into bite sized pieces. Chop green onion and grate cheese.
  • Add broccoli and green onion to a pan with butter and sauté on medium heat until broccoli is bright green and slightly tender, about 7 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.
  • Preheat the oven to 177°C. Whisk together eggs and milk, seasoning generously with salt and pepper.
  • On a floured surface, roll both halves of the sprouted spelt pie crust to about ⅛" thick. Using a 4-4.5" round cookie cutter, cut out circles of dough. Re-roll scrapes until all of the dough is used. Place the dough circles in a clean* muffin tin, forming them gently to the bottom.
  • Using approximately half of the cheese, add a small amount to the bottom of each cup. Distribute broccoli mixture evenly through the cups, they should look about ½ to ¾ full. Pour egg mixture over the broccoli until the cup is about ¾ full (it's okay if there is some broccoli sticking out) and top with remaining cheese.
  • Bake for 25-30 minutes, until the egg is set and crust is lightly browned.

Notes

*do not use paper cups, butter or oil to prepare the tin. The quiche will not stick to the pan.
These can be made ahead of time and stored in the fridge for a few days, simply reheat in the oven at 350°F until warm.
If you want to make a full size quiche, follow the instructions for sprouted spelt pie crust and reduce the filling recipe by 1 egg (makes one full size quiche + an extra crust).

Have you made this recipe? Tag @secondspringaustralia on Instagram!

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Apple Pie with Sprouted Spelt Crust

Apple pie with sprouted spelt flour crust

Apple Pie with Sprouted Spelt Crust

This sprouted whole grain spelt double crusted pie is ready for any sweet or savoury filling, including this traditional apple version.
80 minutes (+30 minute rest)
1 Pie
Enjoy warm with good people.
Apple pie with sprouted spelt flour crust

Pie crust is one of those classic baked goods that many people find intimidating, let alone an 100% whole grain version. Well we’re here to tell you that flakey, wholesome, buttery sprouted goodness is not only attainable, it’s actually pretty simple! Sprouted spelt has a wonderful rich, nutty flavour that works so well in this all butter crust. Don’t worry if you’ve never made homemade pie crust, we’re here for any questions you may have!

HOW TO MAKE SPROUTED SPELT PIE CRUST

This pie crust recipe is made with only sprouted spelt flour, salt, butter and water. If you prefer a sweeter crust, feel free to dissolve 1 tbsp of brown sugar in the cold water before adding to the dough.

For a single (bottom only) crust:
  • Divide the dough in half and roll to 1-2″ larger than your pie plate. Carefully transfer the dough to the pie plate and gently shape it to the bottom with your hands. Repeat with the second half for two pies, or you can freeze the second half for later use
For a double crust:
  • Divide the dough in half and roll one to 1-2″ larger than your pie plate, then transfer to the pie plate as usual. Once the dough is chilled and the pie is filled, roll out the second half of the dough and place it overtop. Fold the edge of the top piece over the edge of the bottom and press together until the dough is sealed. Fill and decorate as desired, brush with egg wash and cut slits/holes to allow the steam to escape.
  • For lattice crust, follow the directions above, but cut your top crust into strips and weave together before sealing the edges.
The key here is to follow the directions closely. You want the butter and water to be COLD and add the water 1 tbsp at a time (or even slower) until the dough just comes together. I often read recipes and think to myself, is that chilling step necessary? Well in this case it’s a resounding “yes”. You’ll want the crust itself to be cold as it goes into the oven so the butter melts at the right rate, giving it all those beautiful flakey layers. Not to worry, the rest time just means you have time to preheat the oven and prepare the filling.

Pie crust made with sprouted spelt flour

filling

This recipe will work for any sweet or savoury pie. Fill with your favourite fruit, meat, custard, quiche, pot pie – you name it!

For the apple pie filling, we used rapadura sugar (also called panela sugar), which is whole cane sugar (unrefined) that gives a rich molasses taste and a dark brown colour. We highly recommend it (in all your baking!), you can find it in some health food stores or online, this is the kind we used. You can also substitute coconut or brown sugar. We added just a couple pinches of coarse brown sugar on top, resulting in a toffee-like crunch, an extra hint of sweetness and some sparkle, but it is optional. We also chose Cortland apples for the filling as they are juicy, fairly firm and slightly tart, but you can choose based on your preference and what’s available seasonally in your area (more apple recommendations in the recipe notes).

CAN I SUBSTITUTE SHORTENING OR LARD?

Yes, you can substitute shortening or lard 1:1 in this recipe. 

  • Why Shortening? It melts at a slower rate and is easier to work with, and it’s also suitable for vegans. However, shortening has no flavour. We recommend if you’re using shortening to add some shortening and some butter for flavour (equal to 3/4 cup total).
  • Why lard? It’s easy to work with and has a wonderful flavour, but this is not an option for vegetarians.

We chose all butter because of the wonderful flavour it imparts, but feel free to use the fat of your preference.

CAN I MAKE MY PIE CRUST AHEAD OF TIME?

Absolutely! Mix your dough then flatten into a rough disk and wrap in plastic, or roll out the pie crust and put the whole pie tin in the fridge or freezer. The dough can keep in the fridge for a few days. Simply add 1 tsp of vinegar or 1 tbsp of brown sugar to the recipe to prevent the crust from oxidizing. If kept in the freezer, thaw in the fridge the day before you’ll be using it.

CAN I BLIND BAKE THIS PIE CRUST?

Some pie recipes require you to bake the crust but not the filling, in this case you bake the pie shell empty. We don’t recommend blind baking if you’re using all butter because the crust will shrink. If you need to blind bake, substitute shortening or lard.

HOW DO I DECORATE MY PIE CRUST?

Not sure how to flute the edges? It’s pretty easy, I just used my fingers (YouTube is very helpful). But if you don’t want to spend time learning, simply indent with a fork to seal the edges. It’s all about your preference, no special skills required. If you’d like tutorial videos for fluting the edges, let me know in the comments below. You can also use this dough for a lattice top or to cut out shapes.

Apple Pie with Sprouted Spelt Crust

This sprouted whole grain spelt double crusted pie is ready for any sweet or savoury filling, including this traditional apple version.
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 55 minutes
Resting time: 30 minutes
Servings: 1 Pie

What You'll Need:

Crust

  • cups Second Spring Sprouted Spelt Flour
  • ¾ cup COLD butter
  • 5-6 tbsp ice cold water  (add several ice cubes and stir or place water in the freezer for at least 20 minutes)
  • 1 tsp salt

Filling

  • 6 medium/large apples*
  • ½ cup panela rapadura sugar**
  • 3 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 egg
  • coarse sugar for sprinkling (optional)

How To Make It:

  • Prepare the crust by mixing flour and salt together in a large bowl. Using a pastry blender or fork, cut in cold butter until you have pea-sized pieces. Sprinkle water over the mixture one tbsp at a time and work the dough with your hands. Stop adding water when the dough starts to form large clumps. Continue mixing until the dough just comes together. Do not overwork, you should still be able to see specks of butter.
  • Divide the dough in half and transfer one piece to a lightly floured work surface. Roll the dough about 1-2" larger than your pie plate. Add a little flour if needed and if it cracks, wet your fingers and gently press it back together. Transfer dough to the pie plate (leave the edges rough for now). Wrap the other half in plastic wrap, place both in the fridge and allow to chill for at least 30 minutes.
  • Preheat the oven to 190°C.
  • Peel and slice the apples. In a large bowl, combine sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon and nutmeg. Add the apples and melted butter and toss until coated (don't worry if the rapadura sugar clumps, it will still melt evenly).
  • Mound the apple mixture into the pie crust and spread to fill the bottom.
  • Roll out the second half of the pie crust to about an inch larger than the pie plate. Loosely roll it around the rolling pin and carefully transfer it to the top of the pie.
  • Fold the edge of the top crust around the edge of the bottom. Pinch it together with your fingers or a fork to seal it, and flute if desired.
  • Lightly beat the egg and brush it all over the top. Sprinkle with coarse sugar, if using. Take a sharp knife and make several slits in the top of the crust to let steam escape.
  • Bake for 50-60 minutes. The filling needs to be bubbling and the crust should be golden brown. Allow to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing and serving.

Notes

*Choose apples according to your preference and what is available. We used Cortland apples, which are great for pies because they are juicy, fairly firm and slightly tart. Empire are also a great choice, Granny Smith are popular for a more tart pie and Golden Delicious are great for a sweeter pie. 
**Panela Rapadura sugar is raw cane sugar (unrefined), and brings a rich molasses flavour to the pie. You can find it in some health food stores, or we actually source ours on Amazon. You can substitute coconut sugar or brown sugar. 

Have you made this recipe? Tag @secondspringaustralia on Instagram!

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